Food production

Today’s intensive food production method based on economic growth, the maximisation of profits and the cultivation of standardised crops over enormous areas cannot be sustained indefinitely. This type of farming requires increasing amounts of external inputs such as fossil fuels and chemicals to support growth and protect crops, biotechnology and patented seeds.

Today’s intensive food production method based on economic growth, the maximisation of profits and the cultivation of standardised crops over enormous areas cannot be sustained indefinitely. This type of farming requires increasing amounts of external inputs such as fossil fuels and chemicals to support growth and protect crops, biotechnology and patented seeds.

Intensive agriculture has many unintended negative impacts on the environment and mankind, including the loss of biodiversity, the destruction of ecosystems, the disappearance of nutrients and life from the soil, the release of greenhouse gases contributing to climate change, diseases caused by pesticides in the food chain, deterioration of the life of local communities in the global South, and many more.

A total of 75% of food produced today comes from only 12 plant and 5 animal species. Moreover, the past century has witnessed the radical reduction of agrobiodiversity – we have lost three-quarters of the diversity of agricultural crops and livestock. Exacerbating this situation is the policy of patented seeds, a system in which farmers are forced each year to purchase hybrid seeds from seed corporations, trapping them in a cycle of debt.

If we wish to secure adequate access to quality food for all in the future while also preserving our planet in a habitable condition, it is absolutely essential to change the form of our current food systems in favour of local and seasonal agroecological production. Each and every one of us can contribute to this goal by choosing a responsible diet.